Eating For Fertility

There’s a lot of misinformation out there about fertility diets and the best way to eat to conceive.

Amazon lists over 29 pages of fertility nutrition books and a simple Google search for “fertility nutrition” reveals over 68 million results! No doubt some of this information is accurate and useful but navigating it is overwhelming, confusing and potentially dangerous. The world would like us to believe that you must eat specific foods in order to get pregnant, and sometimes I do recommend specific things for conditions such as PMS, PCOS, amenorrhea, endometriosis, or a specific Chinese Medicine diagnosis, but the reality is that there is NO one secret ingredient that will make you conceive.

We have all occasionally fallen into the trap of wanting quick, easy cures to solve roadblocks we encounter in life. This is why the supplement industry and the pharmaceutical industry are multi-billion dollar industries (a topic for another day!).  The secret is that there is no secret because eating for enhanced fertility, for most of us, is about several simple and key principles.

Tip #1: Avoid the Package and Eat the Rainbow.

Tip #2: Eliminate, eliminate, eliminate.  

Tip #3: Eat more #greens, and the darker the better.  

Tip #4: Eat #livefoods.

Sometimes, worrying less about eating the perfect foods to help get you pregnant and more about eating a balanced diet with a lot of variety of whole foods as well as eliminating those things which are making you unhealthy in the first place, will support your fertility 100x better than eating the latest fad food or diet. They say that history tends to repeat itself but this is never more evident than in our lifestyles and the food choices we make. It has been almost 30-years since C Everett Koop, M.D. and former Surgeon General reported in the 1988 Surgeon General’s Report on Nutrition and Health that “improper diet plays a prominent role in two-thirds of all causes of death in the U.S.”  What this means to me is that we have the ability with the food choices we make to avoid the majority of diseases we get, including infertility.



Katherine Anderson